About your Search

20121108
20121108
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
to washington-- if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, it would push the economy into a recession. and late today, a top credit rating agency puts the odds of going off the cliff at 15%. plus, how g.o.p. economic policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, extending yesterday's sharp losses. the do
for business leaders. the c.e.o. of caesars entertainment, tells us it'll be "very damaging" for his company. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! wall street greeted the election results with a big sell-off in stocks. investors dumped shares of almost every type, giving the s&p 500 it's worst day since june. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from here. >> reporter: let's be candid. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at the new
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)